Coronavirus: Community Updates & FAQs

Last updated April 2, 2020

Please find below all relevant updates as well as responses to questions regarding impacts on the Shanghai Community International School community from the novel Coronavirus event.

We are closely monitoring the ongoing developments of the current novel coronavirus outbreak and are in routine communication with all relevant government agencies, including the Shanghai Education Commissions and the Center for Disease Control, in addition to our colleagues at international schools around Shanghai and across China.

Please know that our leadership team is working meticulously to plan for the health and safety of our community, and we will continue to communicate critical updates and information transparently to our parent community. We pledge our continued effort to gather information and provide more detailed information to all of you as soon as we are able. As such, we ask you to regularly come back to this page.

Thank you for your continued understanding, patience, and your effort toward all that remains ahead.

Government Requirements

Family Travel Update
As required by the Shanghai Education Commission, SCIS has been tasked with getting 100% submission from all SCIS families regarding their travel plans during this time. Most of you have already submitted your information to our Travel Itinerary Survey which was sent via email on January 27. If you have not completed this survey or if your travel plans change, we request that you answer this survey again.

Note: Please use your scis-parent.org account to complete the survey below.

(Posted Feb. 5) Notice of Campus Closure: February 3 – End of February
In consideration of the request of the Shanghai Municipal Education Commission and in coordination with other Shanghai International School Association members, SCIS has received confirmation from the Shanghai Education Commission (SEC) that all schools (Public, Private, and International) have received notice that we will not be able to open our campuses prior to the end of February. During this closure period, SCIS campuses will not be accessible to SCIS students or guests for any activity. Thus, all educational, athletic, performing arts, admission tours, student club meetings, and ASAs will be canceled.​

(Posted Feb. 5) Will SCIS open its campus in March?
At this point, we are planning for this. This is a possibility that needs to be considered and which will depend on the decision of the Shanghai Municipal Education Commission, in regard to the evolution of the situation. SCIS is in contact with the local authorities and will keep the whole community informed of any change. We ask families to be attentive to the information sent by the school.

(Posted Feb. 5) What is the procedure for people returning to Shanghai?
As of today, only those returning from “severely affected areas” (Hubei Province) should spontaneously report to the authorities and be placed in confinement, either at home or in medical observation facilities. Those who show symptoms or are sick must follow medical protocols and report to the designated hospitals.

(Posted Feb. 5) Is the 14-day self-quarantine in Shanghai mandatory?
SCIS continues to work with the appropriate governmental authorities, at present we do not have clear guidelines on whether there is a requirement for the 14-day self-quarantine for all travelers, or if it is only for those that have traveled to Wuhan, Hubei Province, or other identified areas within the travel ban.

(Posted Feb. 5) During the self-quarantine period in Shanghai, what should we be cautious about? 
Should you be compelled to participate in the 14-day self-quarantine you should refrain from attending large social gatherings. Many Shanghai attractions have already made decisions to close their doors temporarily. Additionally, do not spend time with anyone feeling unwell, specifically those with the symptoms of influenza or the Coronavirus. If you do feel unwell, see a doctor immediately.

Virtual Learning

(Posted Feb. 5) What is the goal of virtual learning at SCIS?
SCIS campuses will be closed to parents, students, and faculty. The goal of virtual learning is to best ensure continuity of learning and a sense of community and connection during the school’s closure.

(Posted Feb. 5) How will I (and my child) receive work?
SCIS will use our existing online learning platforms as the primary points of communication.

  • Lower School Families: Seesaw
  • Upper School Families: ManageBac
  • Additionally, individual teachers may choose to utilize other platforms to extend student learning

(Posted Feb. 5) When will work be posted?
On Monday, February 3, all teachers will engage in a professional in-service, thus we will send out more detailed information on the day to ensure all parents are accessing information in the correct location. You can expect that your child’s first learning tasks will be posted online on Tuesday, February 4th.

(Posted Feb. 5) Are these real school days? What is expected?
Yes. Virtual school days will require dedication and hard work by both students and teachers. Attendance will be taken through each child’s continued progress within the online class environment. We appreciate you supporting your child’s effort in this regard. Similar to a traditional school day, your child will have an age-appropriate amount of work to complete each day with clear due dates, lessons, instructions, feedback, and grades.

(Posted Feb. 5) Are teachers still available for support and additional explanation?
Yes. Each teacher will be available during scheduled hours each day between 8:00 – 3:00 (Shanghai time). Principals will share more information in their communication tomorrow regarding schedules. Additionally, teachers may have some optional times available after 3:00 as well.

(Posted Feb. 5) Who can I contact if I have questions?  
We remain committed to supporting you. Much like a regular school day, if you have questions regarding your technology, contact our tech support staff. Contact information is shared below. If you have a question about your child’s homework, you or your child should contact the teacher.  If you have questions of a general nature they are best addressed to the division Principal.

(Posted Feb. 5) How can I support my child’s learning during this time?

Ensure that your child has access to technology: high-quality internet, access to a computer and an appropriate space for school-related work.

  • If parents/students do not have (regular) access to a computer/internet, we ask parents to take a proactive approach and notify the school 48 hours in advance.
  • If you or your child have any technical problems, reach out to our SCIS Tech Support Team.

Establish realistic expectations and school-like routines: Your child may view this as a vacation. If so, this may become a frustrating experience as they fall behind academically and view schoolwork as an “extra”. While there will be more flexibility within the day, it is still very much a school day with expectations for engaging in learning. For health and academic reasons, ensure appropriate sleep, nutrition, and exercise.

Preview frustrations and celebrate growth: The next few weeks will have challenges. Technology may fall short on speed and connectivity; assignments may become lost or need further clarification to understand what is expected. Virtual learning will require more self-regulation; please help your child(ren) plan ahead. Throughout it, all help your child(ren) view this period with a growth mindset. There will be lots of learning (and not all of it will be within the virtual classroom). Be open to that with your child. Give them time to reflect, express their feelings, and grow.

Virus Information & Preventive Measures

(Posted Mar 3.) Are children more susceptible to the virus that causes COVID-19 compared with the general population and how can infection be prevented? Content source: National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD)Division of Viral Diseases

No, there is no evidence that children are more susceptible. In fact, most confirmed cases of COVID-19 reported from China have occurred in adults. Infections in children have been reported, including in very young children. From limited information published from past Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) outbreaks, infection among children was relatively uncommon.

For information on risk, please see the current risk assessment. Children should engage in usual preventive actions to avoid infection, including cleaning hands often using soap and water or alcohol-based hand sanitizer, avoiding people who are sick, and staying up to date on vaccinations, including influenza vaccine.  Additional information on prevention measures can be found here (Prevention for 2019 Novel Coronavirus).

(Posted Mar 3.) Does the clinical presentation of COVID-19 differ in children compared with adults? Content source: National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD)Division of Viral Diseases

Limited reports of children with COVID-19 in China have described cold-like symptoms, such as fever, runny nose, and cough. Gastrointestinal symptoms (vomiting and diarrhea) have been reported in at least one child with COVID-19. These limited reports suggest that children with confirmed COVID-19 have generally presented with mild symptoms, and though severe complications (acute respiratory distress syndrome, septic shock) have been reported, they appear to be uncommon.  See more information on CDC Clinical Guidance for COVID-19.

(Posted Mar 3.) Are children at increased risk for severe illness, morbidity, or mortality from COVID-19 infection compared with adults? Content source: National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD)Division of Viral Diseases

There have been very few reports of the clinical outcomes for children with COVID-19 to date. Limited reports from China suggest that children with confirmed COVID-19 may present with mild symptoms and though severe complications (acute respiratory distress syndrome, septic shock) have been reported, they appear to be uncommon. However, as with other respiratory illnesses, certain populations of children may be at increased risk of severe infection, such as children with underlying health conditions.

(Posted Mar 3.) Are there any treatments available for children with COVID-19? Content source: National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD)Division of Viral Diseases

There are currently no antiviral drugs recommended or licensed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for COVID-19. Clinical management includes prompt implementation of recommended infection prevention and control measures in healthcare settings and supportive management of complications. See more information on CDC Clinical Guidance for COVID-19.

Children and their family members should engage in usual preventive actions to prevent the spread of respiratory infections, including covering coughs, cleaning hands often with soap and water or alcohol-based hand sanitizer, and staying up to date on vaccinations, including influenza.  Additional information on prevention measures can be found here (Prevention for 2019 Novel Coronavirus).

(Posted Feb. 5) Where can I find out more information about the virus? 
Community members are encouraged to follow the tips and advice provided by the following organizations:

You can monitor the US CDC’s current health situation threat levels at this website

(Posted Feb. 5) If I am showing symptoms of the virus and need medical treatment, where can I go?
Click on the following Shanghai CDC link for a list of Shanghai-hospitals and fever clinics open which are open to accepting potentially infected patients. Please note that these are all local hospitals and Mandarin translation assistance may be helpful.

(Posted Feb. 5) Who can I talk to about personal anxiety and trauma as a result of the health situation?
Families can also reach out to our partner organization, Community Center Shanghai, for mental and emotional support.

(Posted Feb. 5) What preventive measures can we take to reduce the risk of infection?

  • Avoid contact with live animals including poultry and birds, and consumption of raw and undercooked meats.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are unwell or showing symptoms of illnesses.
  • Observe good personal hygiene.
  • Practice frequent hand-washing with soap.
  • Wear a mask if you have respiratory symptoms such as a cough or runny nose.
  • Cover your mouth with a tissue paper when coughing or sneezing, and dispose of tissue paper in the rubbish bin immediately.
  • Seek medical attention promptly if you are feeling unwell.

School Re-opening

We are working to outline and communicate all of the necessary steps we will take to ensure the safety of our students and compliance with any government requirements. Please stay tuned for more information within this section.

Social & Emotional Support 

Lower School Parents

Anxiety and Fear
The sudden onset and growing concerns of the Coronavirus have taken all of us out of our routines and placed us into unknown territory. During this time, there are many things that feel out of our control. Feelings of powerlessness and hopelessness in our lives very often trigger negative emotions such as anxiety and fear. This is true for both children and adults. Understanding our children both personally and developmentally, we can imagine that as parents you are experiencing a wide range of reactions from your kids, which will likely evolve as time goes by.

The constant blasts of conflicting information on the news, on social media, and throughout ongoing conversations create stress and uncertainty for even the strongest among us. Fortunately, as adults, we have the capacity to sift through the constant chatter and take it one day at a time. Children, however, have not developed the skill of recognizing how the media sensationalizes and dramatizes information for its own gain. As a result, it is likely that the constant sources of conflicting information can feel completely overwhelming and scary.

Anxiety and Mindfulness (Nursery-Grade 5)
How to Help Children Manage Fears (Nursery-Grade 2)
Helping Children Cope with Frightening News  (Preschool-Grade 5)
The Reality of Fear and What to Do Next  (Nursery-Grade 5)

Anxiety and Fear Videos (VPN Required)
How Parents Can Help With Child Anxiety  (Nursery-Grade 5)
Five Ways to Build Resilience (All parents & students Grade 4-5)

Organization, Time Management, and Self-Regulation
One of the most important ways that you as parents can help students successfully navigate the virtual learning experience is to focus on helping your child organize themselves, create a routine, and manage their time. This is essential for most children who are still strengthening these important executive functioning skills. We recommend that you take an active approach in helping them to create routine and structure in order to for them to feel successful.

Interventions for Executive Functioning Challenges: Time Management (Pre-Kindergarten-Grade 5)
Executive Functioning Skills: Organization and Time Management (Grade 3-Grade 5)
Helping Kids Who Struggle With Executive Functioning  (Preschool-Grade 5)

Mindfulness
At SCIS we are working to incorporate Mindfulness practices into the lives of our students. Among many other things, mindfulness practices such as meditation and breathing exercises have been directly linked to a decrease in stress and anxiety, an increase in confidence and self-esteem, an ability to better manage strong emotions, and even improved grades! If you are finding that you or your children are experiencing challenging emotions as a result of our current circumstances, we suggest you consider incorporating some of these mindfulness exercises into your lives. It may help everyone adjust!

Child Mind Institute (Preschool-Grade 5)
Everyday Mindsight Tools (Grade 3- Grade 5)
The Power of Mindfulness (Preschool-Grade 5)
Mindful Parenting (Preschool-Grade 5)

Mindfulness Videos
Mindfulness Meditations for Kids (VPN Required) (Grade 2- Grade 5)
Cosmic Kids Yoga & Meditation (VPN Required) (Preschool-Grade 5)
How to Breathe Mindfully (Preschool-Grade 5)
Five Fun Breathing Exercises for Kids (Preschool-Grade 5)
Three Breathing Exercised to Calm Kids of All Ages (Preschool-Grade 5)
Mindful Breathing Meditation (VPN Required) (Kindergarten-Grade 5)
Stress Management Strategies: Ways to Unwind (VPN Required) (Parents & Grade 4-Grade 5)
Stop! Name Your Feeling Dance Video (VPN Required) (Pre-Kindergarten-Grade 2)
Calming Down Anger Video (Grade 3- Grade 5)

Motivation
We can imagine that for some of your children, getting motivated to do school work rather than swim in the pool or sleep all day is a very real part of your current reality. Below are some resources on how to conceptualize your attempts to motivate your kids, including things to do and things to avoid.

Does Your Child Lack Motivation? (Kindergarten-Grade 5)
How To Help Your Child Get Motivated in School  (Kindergarten-Grade 5)

Transitions and Changes
As adults, we are developmentally equipped to more effectively manage the internal experiences of the “unknown,” whereas children can easily become overwhelmed by their emotional experience and may be inclined to “act out” emotionally or behaviorally as a way of communicating their internal confusion. If you are noticing that your child’s behavior, attitude, or emotions are markedly different during this time, it is likely that they are struggling with an internal emotional experience that they have not yet learned how to communicate effectively. It is important for parents to recognize the potential experiences that their child may be having, validate those experiences, and give time, space, love, and acceptance while they work through their complicated feelings.

Why Do Kids Have Trouble With Transitions? (Grade 1- Grade 5)
Helping Your Child Through Change or difficult transitions (Pre-Kindergarten-Grade 5)
Tips for Handling Change (Preschool-Grade 5)

Transitions and Change Videos
Helping Anxious Kids Deal With Life Changes (Requires VPN) (Grade 1-Grade 5)
Three Tips to Help Deal with Change (All parents & students Grade 4-Grade 5)

From Community Center Shanghai

  • We would also like to share a few tips with you to help manage any anxiety or panic related to the Coronavirus:
  • Limit time on social media if it escalates your anxiety or plants new worries and fears. Get your facts from trusted news sources for example WHO, consulates, People’s Daily人民日报, and Shanghai Announcement上海发布, etc.
  • Don’t spend excessive amounts of time dwelling on the situation and reading copious amounts of information about it. The basics are sufficient. Find positive things to focus your attention and energy on.
  • Use this increased time at home to do what is best for you, whether that is resting and enjoying some downtime, being productive and tackling all those unfinished (or unstarted!) projects, or bonding with family and making special memories.
  • Be cautious and safe and take reasonable precautions but keep things in perspective.
  • Trust that this too will pass, life will get back to normal (or as normal as it ever is here!), and in the meantime, you are competent and capable to handle the challenge and support is available.

What guidelines does the CDC recommend for parents?

While the CDC has not written a tailored 2019-nCoV response for parents, their basic guidelines apply:

  • Talk to your child directly; ask them what they have heard about the disease.
  • Listening for underlying fears, concerns and misinformation your children may have is important, so the parent knows what to address in their response. Do not make it a one-time conversation and ensure channels of communication are open.
  • Gently correct misinformation.
  • Tailoring your response for your child’s age, development and concerns, make sure you correct any misinformation they may have heard using reliable health authority resources.
  • Answer questions in a way that reassures and doesn’t scare.
  • Keep your answers simple and direct, give your children practical advice on how to stay healthy. Allow your children to express their feelings and encourage them to continue to do so. Remind your child that they shouldn’t be afraid to play with friends or classmates who may have visited or be from the affected area.
Upper School Parents

Anxiety and Fear
The sudden onset and growing concerns of the Coronavirus have taken all of us out of our routines and placed us into unknown territory. During this time, there are many things that feel out of our control. Feelings of powerlessness and hopelessness in our lives very often trigger negative emotions such as anxiety and fear. This is true for both children and adults. Understanding our students both personally and developmentally, we can imagine that as parents you are experiencing a wide range of reactions from your kids, which will likely evolve as time goes by.

The constant blasts of conflicting information on the news, on social media, and throughout ongoing conversations create stress and uncertainty for even the strongest among us. Fortunately, as adults, we have the capacity to sift through the constant chatter and take it all with a “grain of salt.” We take it one day at a time. We know intellectually that we are not doomed forever as a result of this virus, even if it’s a stressful experience.

Children, however, have not necessarily developed the skill of recognizing how the media sensationalizes and dramatizes information for its own gain. As a result, it is likely that the constant sources of conflicting information can feel completely overwhelming and terrifying. In addition, students have now been tasked with the challenge of engaging in online learning, which is new for everyone. Add to that the potentially limited access to technology, time differences, worry about “doing it right” or being successful, lack of daily routine, being away from home, and missing friends/family members, it is easy to imagine that our students may be experiencing new or increased levels of stress, fear, and anxiety,

Below we have included some articles and videos for parents who would like tips and tricks for helping children who may be experiencing strong emotions such as anxiety and fear.

Anxiety and Mindfulness
How to Help Children Manage Fears
Helping Children Cope with Frightening News
The Reality of Fear and What to Do Next

Anxiety and Fear Videos (VPN Required)
How Parents Can Help With Child Anxiety

Organization, Time Management, and Self-Regulation
One of the most important ways that you as parents can help students successfully navigate the virtual learning experience is to focus on helping your child organize themselves, create a routine, and manage their time. This is essential for most children who are still strengthening these important executive functioning skills. We recommend that you take an active approach in helping them to create routine and structure during this uncertain time in order to enhance their potential for success.

Interventions for Executive Functioning Challenges: Time Management
Executive Functioning Skills: Organization and Time Management
Helping Kids Who Struggle With Executive Functioning
Strategies to Help Make Homework Go More Smoothly

Organization, Time Management, and Self-Regulation Videos (VPN Required)
How to Help Your Teen With Time Management
Time Management For Teens: Tips For Tackling Procrastination

Mindfulness
At SCIS we are working to incorporate Mindfulness practices into the lives of our students. Among many other things, mindfulness practices such as meditation and breathing exercises have been directly linked to a decrease in stress and anxiety, an increase in confidence and self-esteem, an ability to better manage strong emotions, and even improved grades! If you are finding that you or your children are experiencing challenging emotions as a result of our current circumstances, we suggest you consider incorporating some of these mindfulness exercises into your lives. It may help everyone adjust!

Everyday Mindsight Tools
The Power of Mindfulness
Mindful Parenting
Mindfulness: How and Why it Works

Mindfulness Videos (VPN Required)
What is Mindfulness?

Motivation
At the moment, many of you are sitting on the beach, nestled into your resorts, or in your hometown surrounded by family and friends. We all went from being on holiday where we were experiencing peace, freedom, and fun to suddenly finding ourselves in our holiday location with the need to work and study rather than play. It’s no doubt a challenge to get into the swing of things with all of the conflicting stimuli around us.

We can imagine that for some of your children, getting motivated to do homework rather than swim in the pool or sleep all day is a very real part of your current reality. Adolescents are already famous for lacking motivation so this specific situation may pose some serious challenges for your kids over the next few weeks. Below are some resources on how to conceptualize your attempts to motivate your kids, including things to do and things to avoid.

Does Your Child Lack Motivation?
How To Help Your Child Get Motivated in School

Motivation Videos (VPN Required)
How to Motivate Your Teenager

Transitions and Changes
At SCIS, students, faculty, and staff are uniquely familiar with the concepts of change and transition. That being said, familiarity doesn’t necessarily make these experiences any easier to navigate. As adults, we are developmentally equipped to more effectively manage the internal experiences of the “unknown,” whereas children can easily become overwhelmed by their emotional experience and may be inclined to “act out” emotionally or behaviorally as a way of communicating their internal confusion. If you are noticing that your child’s behavior, attitude, or emotions are markedly different during this time, it is likely that they are struggling with an internal emotional experience that they have not yet learned how to communicate effectively. It is important for parents to recognize the potential experiences that their child may be having, validate those experiences, and give time, space, love, and acceptance while they work through their complicated feelings.

Why Do Kids Have Trouble With Transitions?
Helping Your Child Through Change or difficult transitions
5 Ways to Help Teens Cope With Change

Transitions and Changes Videos (VPN Required)
Helping Anxious Kids Deal With Life Changes

From Community Center Shanghai

We would also like to share a few tips with you to help manage any anxiety or panic related to the Coronavirus:

  • Limit time on social media if it escalates your anxiety or plants new worries and fears. Get your facts from trusted news sources for example WHO, consulates, People’s Daily人民日报, and Shanghai Announcement上海发布, etc.
  • Don’t spend excessive amounts of time dwelling on the situation and reading copious amounts of information about it. The basics are sufficient. Find positive things to focus your attention and energy on.
  • Use this increased time at home to do what is best for you, whether that is resting and enjoying some downtime, being productive and tackling all those unfinished (or unstarted!) projects, or bonding with family and making special memories.
  • Be cautious and safe and take reasonable precautions but keep things in perspective.
  • Trust that this too will pass, life will get back to normal (or as normal as it ever is here!), and in the meantime, you are competent and capable to handle the challenge and support is available.

What guidelines does the CDC recommend for parents?

While the CDC has not written a tailored 2019-nCoV response for parents, their basic guidelines apply:

  • Talk to your child directly; ask them what they have heard about the disease.
  • Listening for underlying fears, concerns and misinformation your children may have is important, so the parent knows what to address in their response. Do not make it a one-time conversation and ensure channels of communication are open.
  • Gently correct misinformation.
  • Tailoring your response for your child’s age, development and concerns, make sure you correct any misinformation they may have heard using reliable health authority resources.
  • Answer questions in a way that reassures and doesn’t scare.
  • Keep your answers simple and direct, give your children practical advice on how to stay healthy. Allow your children to express their feelings and encourage them to continue to do so. Remind your child that they shouldn’t be afraid to play with friends or classmates who may have visited or be from the affected area.
Upper School Students

Stress Management
This is definitely a unique situation that we are experiencing right now. We find ourselves embarking in uncharted territory, which can cause various levels of stress. Taking into account the different challenges we will likely face, we wanted to provide some coping strategies if, in fact, your stress levels increase.

Stress Management Techniques for Students
Stress Management Tools
Meditation to Reduce Stress

Stress Management Videos (VPN Required)
Managing Stress – Brainsmart (BBC)
Stress Management Strategies: Ways to Unwind

Mindfulness
Throughout our advisory program and during Wellness Week we’ve touched upon different aspects of mindfulness. This could be a good opportunity to start incorporating mindfulness practices into your routine. You could begin your day with a quietly guided meditation exercise, incorporate mindful breathing between class assignments, or do a body scan when you’re on a break. Take a look at the different techniques and see which one fits you!

Benefits of Mindfulness
Body Scan

Mindfulness Videos
Why Mindfulness Is a Superpower: An Animation (VPN Required)
Five Minute Mindful Breathing (VPN Required)
Bring it Down – Flow (VPN Required)
Audio Meditation – Body Scan (VPN Required)
Mindfulness Tools For Processing Big Feelings

Virtual Learning Studying Tips
We anticipate that adjusting to virtual learning may be a difficult transition, especially because there’s technology involved, different time zones, and multiple classes to account for. University is prime time for online classes so we provided some of their tips and tricks to assist with navigating these next few weeks on your virtual learning journey.

What Makes a Successful Online Learner?
10 Study Tips For Online Learners
21 Study Tips for Online Classes Success

Virtual Learning Videos (VPN Required)
Online Student Success

Organization
Organization can be a hard skill to master, especially if you are stuck at home all day right now or tempted by a beautiful beach or maybe even the glistening snow. To assist with helping you get a handle on managing all of your work without procrastinating too much, we’ve shared some good old’ organizational strategies for you to access.

Time Management for Students
10 Time Management Tips for Students
Pomodoro Study Method

Organization Videos (VPN Required)
How to Stop Procrastination
Time Management Tips
Pomodoro Method Tedx

Resiliency
Dealing with change can be hard to cope with. There are a lot of factors that are out of our control right now. During times like this, how you react and respond will make a world of a difference. This is where grit and resilience come into play. If you’re interested to see how resilient you are (according to Dr. Siebert) take the short, fun quiz entitled, “How Resilient Are You.” Then take a look at the resources to support this particular situation.

Resilience 101
Developing Resilience
What Is Resilience and Why Is It Important?
How Resilient Are You? 

Resiliency Videos (VPN Required)
3 Tips to Help With Transition – How to Deal With Change
Resilience, But What is it? 5 Ways to Build Resiliency

Professional Organization Resources

Surviving & Thriving During the CoVid19

Living and working in China has presented challenges for many SCIS families during the current CoVid19 outbreak. The following resources and information are designed to help you navigate these challenges so that you can survive and, even thrive during the CoVid19 outbreak by providing you resources and information for your mental/emotional health and the mental/emotional health of your family.

 

Managing Anxiety in the Current Reality of the COVID19 Outbreak

Managing your mental health during CoVid19 outbreak
Adapted from a resource created by Holly Poppell, Dulwich College-Suzhou 2020

Be a smart consumer of information related to the CoVid19 outbreak
Some important ways to maintain perspective about this CoVid19 outbreak are to limit your exposure to media about the outbreak and to filter good information from bad.

This article provides a historical perspective about outbreaks and emphasizes facts we currently understand about the CoVid19 outbreak

Additionally, stick to reputable sources when looking online for updates about the virus and outbreak.

QUESTIONS?

Hongqiao ECE Campus

2212 Hongqiao Road, Changning,
Shanghai, China 200336
Tel: 86-21-6295-1222
Fax: 86-21-6261-4639

Hongqiao Campus

1161 Hongqiao Road, Changning,
Shanghai, China 200051
Tel: 86-21-6261-4338
Fax: 86-21-6261-4639

Pudong Campus

198 Hengqiao Road, Zhoupu,
Pudong, Shanghai, China 201315
Tel: 86-21-5812-9888
Fax: 86-21-6261-4639

Hongqiao ECE Campus

2212 Hongqiao Road, Changning,
Shanghai, China 200336
Tel: 86-21-6295-1222
Fax: 86-21-6261-4639

Hongqiao Campus

1161 Hongqiao Road, Changning,
Shanghai, China 200051
Tel: 86-21-6261-4338
Fax: 86-21-6261-4639

Pudong Campus

198 Hengqiao Road, Zhoupu,
Pudong, Shanghai, China 201315
Tel: 86-21-5812-9888
Fax: 86-21-6261-4639